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Car Tyres are NOT created equally – Practical Motoring

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When it comes to changing your car tyres, you can’t have everything, good grip, long-lasting and cheap – not all tyres are created equal.

Source: practicalmotoring.com.au

A good article as usual from practical motoring. It is not rocket science to know that you cannot have a perfect tyre.

When customers buy cheap car tyres, then they are only going to get what they pay for?

Cheap tyres will not last as long as a premium brand such as Continental tyres. Tyre companies such as Continental have put over 100 years of technology and research and development into their products. Budget Car tyres from mainly China are made from mass production facilities, with quantity and not quality in mind.

Buying your car tyres?

Like any purchase that we make, whatever it is then there will be differences in price and quality of the product that you buy.

Buying your car tyres?

Like any purchase that we make, whatever it is then there will be differences in price and quality of the product that you buy.

Car tyres are no exception to this rule?

In general you have a choice of three different types of tyres, the Budget car tyres, the mid-range tyres and the premium car tyres. A very good point to make about choosing car tyres is that there are no real grey areas.

What I mean is that when you buy say clothing, perhaps a new coat, then it is difficult to really know the quality ratio to the price that you pay. You can go to M&S a buy a new pair of trousers then you could pay a high price for something that is made in a huge factory in China.


Car tyres are more specific.

Most motorists have heard of the premium tyre manufacturers. Hence, companies such as Continental, Michelin, Avon and Goodyear. Traditionally, have all been about for well over 100 years. These car tyres will always give you top quality performance and will be long wearing.

There are diversities within this. Of course, you will always find someone who was not satisfied with their mileage or road holding. But in general the leading tyre makers make a very good product.
The premium tyre companies have put over a hundred years into research and development. So, to help create today’s excellent products. The down side is that you will have to pay more. Consequently, these car tyres are often more expensive.

Mid-range car tyres

These are the tyres that are from the up and coming tyre companies of the world, such as Kumho, Hankook, Apollo and Yokohama tyres. These tyre companies also offer an excellent product. They are relatively new tyre companies from the past 20 years and emanate from the east, South Korea and India.

These tyre companies produce a good tyre are not very far behind the premium tyre companies, both in quality and in their marketing efforts. This tyre would be the choice of the undecided motorist who are careful with their money, lady customers will very often choose a mid-range tyre.


Cheap car tyres


This is the final category before slumping to part worn tyres. These tyres are made by various tyre companies. Some are in fact made by the premium tyre companies and would be my choice if I had to buy a

budget car tyre? Michelin make a tyre called the Kormoran tyres. Which are made by the Polish tyre company Stomil Hence, which Michelin. bought/invested in a while back. The tyres are not the same as a Michelin. However, I am sure that Michelin will have had some sort of input into the product.
Other leading tyre makers make similar products and the rest are from Eastern Europe and China. These tyres will not give the mileage and comfort levels of the last two categories’? They are though a much better choice than part worn tyres and in my own area of Halifax Yorkshire UK, are a very popular choice of tyre and worth buying if you have an older car or just tootle about town. I hope this helps. If you are not sure which category of tyre fall into then just ask the guy in your local tyre depot.
Pellon Tyre and Auto-centre offer car and van servicing and repairs to all makes of vehicles.

 

 

Tyre Separation-Car Owners Blame the Tyre Makers but Whose Fault is it realy ?

Tyre Separation-Whose Fault is it?

tyre separation

In all my years in the tyre business, this has always been a difficult thing to judge. One of the reasons is because the tyre often disintegrates into pieces and the original cause cannot be seen , at least with the naked eye.
I am bringing this up because just this week we have had two cases of tyre separation on two different types of vehicle.

One was a car and the other a caravan.

The car had developed a large “egg” on the shoulder area, and the caravan had pieces of tread hanging off after a blowout occurred when the driver was returning from his holidays.
Both of our customers were disgruntled to say the least and both blamed the tyre separation on faulty tyres. More reading…http://www.tirefailures.com/coopertire/tirefailures.html

This takes me back to my younger days

When faulty tyres were very common. Even in my later years I noted that Firestone in America was having huge problems with tyres blowing out on the Ford Explorer.

The problem of the tyres became a mixture of blames as the SUV’s turned over after the tyre blowout occurred, but other problems with the vehicles design came into play, so I won’t go any further with that.

Tyre tread separation in the 70’s

Tyre tread separation in the 1960’s and 70’s became a common thing.The problem stemmed from the tyre companies inability to design

tyre separation
This caravan tyre was due to a screw causing the tyres casing to separate.

and make a worthy steel belted radial to compete with the Michelin tyres, that were out classing all their other rivals in both quality and tyre mileage, the Michelin’s could double the mileage of all the other tyres on the market.

Goodyear and Firestone experimented with different types of steel to make the steel belt wires

But failed to stop the belts oxidising (rusting) and the oxygen that this gave off caused the tyres to separate. (Tyres are made of a build-up of different layers of rubber called a casing).
In the long run they were given a licence from Michelin and the secret of a steel belt coated with alloys made up of brass and copper resulted in the other tyre companies developing a better product, and virtually eliminating the tyre separation problem in their tyre products.

Another problem that let some of the tyre makers down was their lack of cleanliness. In the factories that produced the tyres. I can vouch for this myself, having visited some tyre factories and seen the dirt and dust everywhere.

In fact it has been known , over the years that things like screws and bolts, even a chicken bone and a screwdriver have been found embedded in a tyres structure, eventually giving the tyre owner problems.


The main problem in the past though has been dust and dirt

So contaminating the adhesive that helps to vulcanise the tyre layers together. If dust gets in then the tyre will eventually crack or start to form a bubble due to tyre separation. Other problems can be found with the steel belt. They can form rust and corrosion which can be evidence that there has been some sort of moisture contamination, during manufacture.
Tyre makers can now tell what a more specific problem may be. of moisture contamination during manufacturing. Bare wire is an indication of a manufacturing adhesion defect. Brassy wire is a strong indication that there has been an adhesive left out altogether.

These type of faults can now be detected by the use of High resolution photographs.

These images can be taken of any exposed surfaces as quickly after the problem has been discovered especially if this is required as evidence in an accident case.

Tyre tread separation can be detected at an early stage

This is one of the dilemmas that we face when determining whether the fault lies with the tyre manufacturer or the customer.

The main thing is to make sure that you check your tyres at a regular period and as well as checking the pressures look and feel for any sign of a small lump or bubble. I must admit that they are easy to see on the sidewall but not on the tread area.
These bumps and lumps on the sidewall are usually caused by the tyre being kerbed or if the car hits a stone or runs over a pothole. One of the sidewall cords breaks leaving a week spot, pushing out the rubber to form a lump. If this happens and you detect it, then unfortunately you will have to buy a new tyre.

tread seperation
This tyre looks like it has developed a fault. We could not find any objects that had penetrated the tyre.

The tread area is a little different.

I have found that the main problem for an egg to appear on the shoulder/tread area comes down to a previous puncture repair that the tyre has had. What happens is that the nail or screw, whatever you had in the tyre has damaged the wire in the steel belt and the tyre oxidises, just like a faulty new tyre does.

In 90% of cases an old puncture repair will be to blame and we are able to show the problem to the customer. If we cannot find anything that could have caused a problem then we will send the tyre back to the manufacturers with a suspected faulty tyre.
This is a bit of important advice. If you do go over a pothole or hit a kerb with you tyres bellow the pressure that they should be, then you will increase the chance of tyre damage.

Also if you feel that the car is pulling to the left or right

Subsequently, or your wheels are out of balance then this is an early sign of a separation problem in your tyre. Whenever a customer has a balancing problem, then the first thing we do is to examine the tyre for other problems.

Because it is most unusual for a tyre to go out of balance, unless a wheel weight comes off, which is very rare. So if you need the wheels balancing then it is likely that you will have another problem and it is usually a slipped belt caused by separation.